Nova Scotia extends film incentive for another 5 years

The Canadian province is attracting a lot of film and TV productions, including TV series Chappelwaite, starring Oscar-winner Adrien Brody

The Nova Scotia Film and Television Production Incentive Fund has been extended by the local government for another five years until 2025-26 as more productions flock to the Canadian province.

Big projects to shoot there in the past few months include the new EPIX series Chapelwaite, based on a Stephen King short, Jerusalem’ Lot, starring Oscar winner Adrien Brody and Schitt’s Creek star Emily Hampshire, and the film Wildhood, directed by Bretten Hannam and produced by Rebel Road Films.

“The fund is doing what it was designed to do – encouraging productions and supporting and expanding our local creative industry,” said Geoff MacLellan, minister of business. “Nova Scotia is home to some of the country’s best film producers, screenwriters and technicians and we want to keep them here. We recognize the important positive contribution of the creative economy to our province and we’re pleased to provide the industry some certainty by continuing this fund for the next five years.”

Nova Scotia invested $77.5m in 162 film and television projects in the past four years through the incentive fund. That investment resulted in $292m in production spending. The fund was established in 2015.

The future is looking good for the local industry too with the possibility of a fully booked 2021, according to Laura Mackenzie, executive director of Screen Nova Scotia.

One of the shows due to go into production in Halifax, Nova Scotia early next year is the third season of CBC TV legal drama Diggstown, starring Vinessa Antoine as a legal aid lawyer working with her team to protect vulnerable citizens.

“Shows like Diggstown generate provincial return on investment; they grow a young tech-savvy crew and they showcase Nova Scotia to the world. The incentive fund is one of the most important tools in our industry toolbox,” enthuses Karen Wentzell, producer of the show. “The fund makes it possible for us to compete globally. It helps us bring interprovincial and foreign investment into the province and then allows us to export the product we create – TV shows and movies – to the world.”

Nova Scotia extends film incentive for another 5 years
Diggstown series filming in Halifax, Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia extends film incentive for another 5 years
Diggstown series filming in Halifax, Nova Scotia

The Nova Scotia Film and Television Production Incentive Fund has been extended by the local government for another five years until 2025-26 as more productions flock to the Canadian province.

Big projects to shoot there in the past few months include the new EPIX series Chapelwaite, based on a Stephen King short, Jerusalem’ Lot, starring Oscar winner Adrien Brody and Schitt’s Creek star Emily Hampshire, and the film Wildhood, directed by Bretten Hannam and produced by Rebel Road Films.

“The fund is doing what it was designed to do – encouraging productions and supporting and expanding our local creative industry,” said Geoff MacLellan, minister of business. “Nova Scotia is home to some of the country’s best film producers, screenwriters and technicians and we want to keep them here. We recognize the important positive contribution of the creative economy to our province and we’re pleased to provide the industry some certainty by continuing this fund for the next five years.”

Nova Scotia invested $77.5m in 162 film and television projects in the past four years through the incentive fund. That investment resulted in $292m in production spending. The fund was established in 2015.

The future is looking good for the local industry too with the possibility of a fully booked 2021, according to Laura Mackenzie, executive director of Screen Nova Scotia.

One of the shows due to go into production in Halifax, Nova Scotia early next year is the third season of CBC TV legal drama Diggstown, starring Vinessa Antoine as a legal aid lawyer working with her team to protect vulnerable citizens.

“Shows like Diggstown generate provincial return on investment; they grow a young tech-savvy crew and they showcase Nova Scotia to the world. The incentive fund is one of the most important tools in our industry toolbox,” enthuses Karen Wentzell, producer of the show. “The fund makes it possible for us to compete globally. It helps us bring interprovincial and foreign investment into the province and then allows us to export the product we create – TV shows and movies – to the world.”

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